Introduction of Viptera

In 2009, Syngenta released a genetically engineered corn trait, MIR162, into the U.S. market. Its first generation of MIR162 corn was known as Agrisure Viptera. Agrisure varieties have been genetically engineered to protect corn against damage from insects such as the corn borer and corn rootworm.

Viptera was marketed and introduced to the U.S. market without import approval from China secured. Despite this, Syngenta maintained that approval was imminent. In April 2012, Syngenta’s CEO stated, “On the import approval, it has import approval in all of the major markets. There isn’t outstanding approval for China, which we expect to have quite frankly within the matter of a couple of days.” However, import approval was not ultimately granted until December 2014.


Billions In Damages

Without approval of the new corn trait, China destroyed multiple shipments of genetically modified corn from the U.S. At least one media outlet reported that several large shipments were destroyed by the Chinese government.

Subsequently, in November 2013, China, one of the world’s largest corn importers, began rejecting U.S. corn shipments because they contained a genetically modified variety that has not been approved. The discovery of Syngenta AG’s Agrisure Viptera corn in the shipment dragged on global prices and, by the end of 2013, over 545,000 tons of U.S. corn had been rejected by China.

By April 2014, the rejected corn tonnage had reached 1,450,000. China was not the only country that rejected this GMO corn. 3.3 million Metric tons of U.S. corn were rejected globally as of March 2014. The export market disruptions with China cost U.S. farmers billions of dollars. More importantly, more than 30% of our export partners have banned genetically modified crops.

Why U.S. Corn Prices Dropped

Farmers across Iowa proudly provide crops to millions of Americans and around the world. International agricultural exports account for a significant portion of the income for a wide range of crops, for example 40% of the corn produced by U.S. farmers is exported internationally.

In 2013 and throughout 2014, the Swiss-based company Syngenta marketed and sold genetically modified corn seed to farmers in the United States before the seed was approved by China for import. Without proper approval in place, China has rejected U.S. corn shipments, causing billions of dollars in losses.

Although the enhanced corn allegedly only accounted for 3% of our nation’s crop, there is no way to keep it isolated from the massive amounts of corn produced across the country. China’s refusal to accept millions of bushels of American corn caused a dramatic drop in the price of corn that affected thousands of corn farmers across America who had not even grown Syngenta’s GMO corn.

Farmers in states such as Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Kentucky, Texas, South Dakota, North Dakota, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Minnesota have begun filing suit against Syngenta for the negative impact on the market caused by the company’s reckless use of the genetically modified corn before ensuring its approval in foreign markets. To help recover the ongoing financial damages caused by this company, we are able to connect you with experts in the field who have filed suit against Syngenta.

Those who have suffered financially due to the decline of the corn market may be able to join the dozens of farmers already filing lawsuits against Syngenta in 11 states, as well as in various federal courts.

We can assist farmers across the Midwest and Heartland states in recovering financial compensation for damages caused by the decline in the market due to Syngenta’s actions.

What did Syngenta do to wreck U.S. corn prices?

In 2009, Syngenta released a genetically engineered corn trait, MIR162, into the U.S. market. Its first generation of MIR162 corn was known as “Agrisure Viptera” (“Viptera”). Agrisure varieties have been genetically engineered to protect corn against damage from insects such as the corn borer and corn rootworm. Syngenta sued Bunge North America in August 2011 for product disparagement when Bunge began refusing to buy or store Viptera corn because it was not approved for import to China. Syngenta stated in its April 18, 2012 Earnings Call, “On the import approval, it has import approval in all of the major markets. There isn’t outstanding approval for China, which we expect to have quite frankly within the matter of a couple of days. That remains on track for approval to the very best of our ability. Of course, the regulatory authorities are not something that we can handicap definitively, but we know of no issue with that whatsoever…” Syngenta then went to market without approval from China. The Chinese government has still not approved Syngenta MIR162 corn trait for sale.

How did Syngenta’s GMO corn cause billions of dollars in damages?

China destroyed multiple shipments of genetically modified corn from the U.S. At least one media outlet reported that several large shipments were destroyed by the Chinese government. Subsequently, in November 2013, China, one of the world’s largest corn importers, began rejecting U.S. corn shipments because they contained a genetically modified variety that has not been approved by Beijing. The discovery of Syngenta AG’s Agrisure Viptera corn in the shipment dragged on global prices. By the end of 2013, over 545,000 tons of U.S. corn had been rejected by China. By April 2014, the rejected corn tonnage had reached 1,450,000. China was not the only country that rejected this GMO corn. 3.3 million Metric tons of U.S. corn were rejected lobally as of March 2014. The export market disruptions with China cost U.S. farmers billions of dollars. More importantly, more than 30% of our export partners have banned genetically modified crops.

Is this lawsuit anti-genetically modified organisms (GMOs)?

No, this lawsuit is focused on holding Syngenta accountable for irresponsibly marketing new GMO corn before earning the proper approval from China.

Why did China stop accepting corn exports from the U.S.?

Although the MIR 162 corn, also referred to as Agrisupre Viptera, developed by Syngenta was sold to farmers in 2010, China did not approve the crops for import. In 2013, inspectors found amounts of the Syngenta corn in a shipment to China, causing it to be rejected. The U.S. corn collection system makes it impossible to completely separate the GMO corn, so China refused to accept any shipments of corn from the U.S. to prevent importing the undesired GMO crop.

Who is eligible to seek compensation from Syngenta?

Farmers, shippers, exporters, and other workers have had their income impacted by the effects of the corn market’s decline. Still others have directly lost income based on China’s rejection of U.S. corn. Manufacturers of other corn products, such as corn syrup, which have also been rejected from China, may be eligible as well. All parties suffering financial losses may be entitled to compensation.

Who Can Bring a Claim

The global impact on the corn market, which resulted from China’s ban on U.S. corn, affected thousands of farmers and other workers involved in the corn industry. Those who grew, harvested, or sold non-modified corn in the last year may be able to seek compensation from Syngenta.

Those affected by Syngenta’s action include:


  • Independent farmers
  • Large farms
  • Grain elevators
  • Distributors
  • Exporters
  • Transporters


Due to Syngenta’s negligence, dozens of lawsuits have already been filed in state and federal courts around the country, in an effort to hold the company accountable for harming farmers across the country. The United States Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation consolidated all federal Syngenta GMO corn lawsuits into a centralized multidistrict litigation before the Honorable John W. Lungstrum in the District of Kansas.

About the Lawsuits and Other Mass Torts  TortsTorts

If you have suffered an economic loss because of the drop in the corn market during 2013 and 2014, you may be entitled to financial compensation from Syngenta. We can connect you with experts who will give you advice about participating in a GMO corn lawsuit.


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Seed & Chemical Lawsuits, Issues Concerning Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO), Ag Law, Fire, Class Actions, Whistle Blower Cases, & Mass Torts